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Bones3D
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎12-13-2006

Accidentally Set Router IP to 192.168.1.255

Hey guys,

I recently began having problems maintaining a stable wireless connection with my Linksys BEFW11S4 router after one of my neighbors installed a Netgear router that uses the same default "192.168.1.1" router address as mine does.

After determining our networks were conflicting with one another, I attempted to switch my router's IP to 192.168.1.255, using the built-in web interface, to see if it'd fix the problem. Upon entering the last set of digits and pressing enter, a window briefly popped up saying the IP was out of range. Upon dismissing the window, the router restarted itself, only now using the 192.168.1.255 address I had entered.

While I can still use the router as a gateway using the 192.168.1.255 address, I can't seem to access the web interface on the router itself using that address to change it back to the default 192.168.1.1.

Does anyone have any idea how I can regain control of the router short of a factory reset?
Expert
Expert
Posts: 12,649
Registered: ‎07-16-2006

Re: Accidentally Set Router IP to 192.168.1.255

Are you sure the router did actually change its address? It should never change it to this address as this is the network's broadcast address. Any device connected to the network could answer on this address. Thus, have you checked that the address is not still 192.168.1.1?

If you cannot get it back to work, press the reset button at the back for 30 seconds. This should put it back to factory defaults.
Bones3D
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎12-13-2006

Re: Accidentally Set Router IP to 192.168.1.255

The router did change it's address, since I can't raise it on 192.168.1.1 anymore. But I'm not sure what address it is then, if it's not actually set at 192.168.1.255.

All I know at this point, is that it accepts 192.168.1.255 as the gateway address to get at the rest of the network.
Bones3D
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎12-13-2006

Re: Accidentally Set Router IP to 192.168.1.255

Ok, I got it straightened out.

Going through a wireless connection, 192.168.1.255 was not an accessible address. However, getting at it using a hard-wired connection seems to work.

Upon bringing up the router control panel, the router's IP address was still set specifically at 192.168.1.255, rendering it nearly impossible to access.

I have a feeling much of my problem in this particular case is probably related to the OS used on the client machine (Mac OS X 10.4.7), and maybe the age of the router and it's firmware (v.2) as well.

Anyway, now I gotta figure out this whole other mess with my neighbor's network conflicting with mine.
Expert
Expert
Posts: 12,649
Registered: ‎07-16-2006

Re: Accidentally Set Router IP to 192.168.1.255



Bones3D wrote:
Anyway, now I gotta figure out this whole other mess with my neighbor's network conflicting with mine.




That's an interesting problem, too. What kind of network do you two have? Do you share an internet connection?
Bones3D
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎12-13-2006

Re: Accidentally Set Router IP to 192.168.1.255

Honestly, I'm not sure which of my neighbors it is. It's only by the SSID his router is transmitting that I can identify the source through NetStumbler.

What I do know, is apparently Netgear's wireless routers operate within the same IP range as Linksys routers by default. Somehow, even by putting some distance between the channels each router uses, the IP range of each router can still overlap, even though they are on two different networks. (Loss of packet data up to 50% has not been uncommon.)

This is where I got the idea to change my router's IP address, since my neighbor probably wouldn't change his first.

So, right now, my neighbor is occupying 192.168.1.1** on channel 11, and I'm occupying 192.168.2** on channel 1. So far, there have been no problems with this setup, but it does seem extremely weird that the two networks could even collide in such a manner.
Expert
Expert
Posts: 12,649
Registered: ‎07-16-2006

Re: Accidentally Set Router IP to 192.168.1.255

I cannot see how the problem should be related with the IP addresses.

First: the default Netgear network is 192.168.0.0/255.255.255.0. The router is usually at 192.168.0.1.

Second: as long as you connect to your SSID and your neighbor to his, noone will ever even come close to any IP address problems. These private IP addresses 192.168.*.* are only valid inside a private network. Your private network is the one created by your Linksys router with 192.168.1.*. Wireless and wired clients connected to your router have addresses in this IP address range. As they are private they won't get elsewhere and they cannot conflict with another router someplace else, unless you directly connect both networks somehow, which you don't do. Which private IP address you used does not matter. Nor what your neighbor uses. You can operate two Linksys routers side-by-side with two different SSIDs and the same private IP address range and all clients work fine.

Third: Issues relevant to wireless connections are among others channel assignments. Obviously, when two routers are sending on the same frequency it gets jammed and lowers throughput. The routers try to deal with the situation but it is not trivial as both routers cannot really synchronize to share a channel. Thus it is certainly a good idea to assign a different channel number from your neighbors' routers.


I don't think the change of the IP address has any relevance to the solution of your problem. I am also not sure what you exactly mean when you write "the IP range of each router can still overlap" "even by putting some distance between"...
Bones3D
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎12-13-2006

Re: Accidentally Set Router IP to 192.168.1.255

That is exactly what has me so confused by this.

TCP/IP conflicts alone should not be able to affect the carrier medium (in this case an 802.11* network) directly. It's like saying TCP/IP by itself is capable of frying an ethernet cable. It just doesn't work that way.

Altering an IP address alone should have no bearing on the signal strength of either network. Yet, a TCP/IP collision can cause packet data loss.

There's no seemingly logical reason that both factors should have changed simply by altering my TCP/IP configuration.
Expert
Expert
Posts: 12,649
Registered: ‎07-16-2006

Re: Accidentally Set Router IP to 192.168.1.255

"Yet, a TCP/IP collision can cause packet data loss."

There is nothing like IP collision. IP packets cannot collide. IP is a level above the medium. Only the medium below handles collisions. For example, ethernet handles collisions as it used to be a broadcast medium a long time ago before it turned to a switched network.

The only collision that can happen here is due to the shared air medium. This is one level deeper during the transmission because two transmitter send data at the same time. But this is ethernet and not IP. The IP address in the packets transmitted wireless does not have an influence on the collisions that may happen during transmission.

The only time where I may see a problem coming up which might be resolved with changing IP addresses is when two routers run open with the identical SSID, i.e. no wireless security. If your neighbor runs also a "linksys" network and you do so, too, Any transmission always goes to both routers and both routers will respond if if they can. Any they can if they both run in the same subnet.

Therefore: you should change the SSID of your router to something unique. (remove all previously saved wireless profiles to prevent accidently connections to the next neighbor's Linksys router). Setup wireless security. Use WPA2 Personal if possible.