Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Do you mean 
Reply
MikaelS
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Figure out what speed a router can handle

Hi

 

First time viewer, first time writer :smileyhappy:

 

I am in the same situation as a lot of other people and I know forums get lots of message regarding new purchase of router, but I hope you can bear with me on this :smileyhappy:

 

I currently have a Linksys WRT54GS v1.1. which has been working fantastic and is very stable. My ISP decided to upgrade my connection but this resulted in the router not being able to provide the full speed provided.

 

I have my eyes set on WRT320N or WRT160N but I cannot see if they can handle my connection.

 

Now, my question is. How do I find out what kind of speed a router can handle? This is for both wired and wireless.

 

Cheers,

 

Mikael

 

toomanydonuts
Posts: 6,365
Registered: ‎09-16-2006

Re: Figure out what speed a router can handle

This website claims that they can measure the "WAN to LAN" speed of various routers.

 

http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/component/option,com_chart/Itemid,189/

 

Hope this helps.

MikaelS
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: Figure out what speed a router can handle

Hi

 

Thanks for the link. That helped a lot.

 

But does that mean that I cannot see from specs of a router, what kind of speeds it can handle? It seems a bit strange if I have to go to the site each time I need to find out whether or not a router can handle my connection.

 

 It's a 25/25 Mbit connection, so are fx a router capable of handling 85 mbps okay? (I'm not that experienced in the terminology).

quack
Posts: 2,544
Registered: ‎09-07-2006

Re: Figure out what speed a router can handle

Well thats very hard to find, what speed your router can handel. No router will give you any information at what speed they work. toomanydonuts is right, just go to that website and it will give you all the information.
toomanydonuts
Posts: 6,365
Registered: ‎09-16-2006

Re: Figure out what speed a router can handle

Since you have 25 Mbps service from your ISP, any router that has 25 Mbps or faster WAN to LAN speed should be able to handle your connection.

 

However, to allow for growth over the expected life of the router, I would suggest that you get a router that can handle at least 50 Mbps or faster WAN to LAN.

 

Hope this helps.

MikaelS
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: Figure out what speed a router can handle


toomanydonuts wrote:

Since you have 25 Mbps service from your ISP, any router that has 25 Mbps or faster WAN to LAN speed should be able to handle your connection.

 

However, to allow for growth over the expected life of the router, I would suggest that you get a router that can handle at least 50 Mbps or faster WAN to LAN.

 

Hope this helps.


Thanks :smileyhappy: I do know that but my problem really lies in that I can't seem to find these information on Linksys routers. :-(

 

WRT320N  (datasheet)

 

Where does it say that it can handle X Mbps ? I guess being a Gigabit router it means it can carry up to 1000 Mbps ?

richard804
Posts: 1,272
Registered: ‎02-02-2008

Re: Figure out what speed a router can handle

Your WRT54G v 1 is rated for 54mbps wireless and 100mbps Ethernet.  You need to do a few speedtests using one of many sites.

  1. Connect computer to modem and do the speedtest.  Write down results.
  2. Connect same computer to router and redo the speedtest.  Write down results.
  3. Connect same computer via wireless and redo the speedtest.  Write down results
  4. Compare results.  If they are close to the results from step 1, you do not need a new router.

Changing to an N router will not necessarely increase your Internet speed

Greetings from Northern Ontario, Canada
MikaelS
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: Figure out what speed a router can handle


richard804 wrote:

Your WRT54G v 1 is rated for 54mbps wireless and 100mbps Ethernet.  You need to do a few speedtests using one of many sites.

  1. Connect computer to modem and do the speedtest.  Write down results.
  2. Connect same computer to router and redo the speedtest.  Write down results.
  3. Connect same computer via wireless and redo the speedtest.  Write down results
  4. Compare results.  If they are close to the results from step 1, you do not need a new router.

Changing to an N router will not necessarely increase your Internet speed


Thanks. The reason for me wanting to change the router is because I've already done the tests. It showed that when the router was on, I clearly lacked speed.

 

---------------------
| without router. |
---------------------
SPEEDTEST.NET

 

Test 1

Download 27503
Upload 19655

 

Test 2

Download 27426
Upload 22774

 

Test 3

Download 27560
Upload 15460

 

COMX TPTEST

 

Test 1

Send 27.30 (udp 28.10)
Receive 27.20

 

Test 2

Send 27.30 (udp 28.11)
Receive 27.26

 

Test 3

Send 27.15 (udp 28.11)
Receive 27.00 (udp 26.66)

--------------------
| with router. |
--------------------
SPEEDTEST.NET

 

Test 1

Download 26653
Upload 17811

 

Test 2

Download 25808
Upload 16053

 

Test 3

Download 27325
Upload 17672

 

COMX TPTEST

 

Test 1

Send 27.23 (udp 20.73)
Receive 13.09 (udp 26.83)

 

Test 2

Send 24.98 (udp 19.76)
Receive 12.99 (udp 26.56)

 

Test 3

Send 26.75 (udp 20.74)
Receive 12.34 (udp 27.01)

 

The speedtest.net tests didn't show that much difference but my local ISP's tests showed that Receive is half then normal when the router is on than off.

toomanydonuts
Posts: 6,365
Registered: ‎09-16-2006

Re: Figure out what speed a router can handle

The website that I previously mentioned shows a WAN to LAN speed of 34 Mbps for your WRT54GS.  And your own tests on speedtest.net also confirms that you are getting nearly the same speed with or without your WRT54GS.  This would seem to indicate that your WRT54GS is up to the job of handling your 25 Mbps line.

 

I see that you got slower speeds with the COMX test, but please note that not all speed tests are accurate. 

 

I have always felt that speedtest.net had the most reliable and repeatable speed tests.

 

Another speed test that I have confidence in is the ATT speed test, which is available at:

 

http://helpme.att.net/dsl/speedtest/

 

A)  Please try this site and see what speeds you get.  Maybe the COMX test is simply not working correctly with your equipment.

 

When you do the ATT test, select the city you live in, or the closest one to you.  If none of the cities are close, try two or three cities, and see which tests show the best speed.  With the ATT test, repeat the test 5 times.  Your connection speed is the best of the 5.   Note that this test will rarely give a very high reading which is obviously wrong and should be disregarded.

 

In answer to your earlier questions:

The 54 Mbps of your WRT54GS refers to the wireless g connection speed.  The 100 Mbps refers to the connection speed through the 4 port LAN switch that is built into your router.  Neither of these measures the WAN to LAN speed of your router, which is primarily limited by the speed of the CPU that is built into your router.

 

Likewise, the gigabit (1000 Mbps) speed of the WRT320N only refers to the connection speed for data passing through the built in 4 port switch.  The WAN to LAN speed of the WRT320N (as reported by the website I mentioned) is about 140 Mbps.

 

Additionally, note that the WAN to LAN speeds that I mentioned are actual "data throughput" speeds.   Whereas the 54 Mbps, 100 Mbps, and 1000 Mbps speeds mentioned above are all "connection" speeds.  The actual "data throughput" speed of a 54 Mbps wireless g connection is at most about 25 Mbps, and typically is only 10-15 Mbps (or half the wired speed, whichever is less).  The "data throughput" of a 100 Mbps ethernet switch is typically 95 Mbps.  The "data throughput" of a 1000 Mbps switch is typically limited by the speed of the computers connected to it.   Good quality recently built computers typically have a "data throughput" of 150 Mbps or more using a gigabit switch.