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venum4802
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎08-13-2009

How to configure WRT400n as an access point?

Greetings,

 

I have a new WRT400n that works well as a router. I am quite please with it.

 

I would like to configure it as an access point on my LAN, similar to the way my WAP55AG works.

 

My research on the Internet and on these forums indicate that I have to disable DHCP on the router as well as use the LAN ports to connect it to my network.

 

I am able to turn off DHCP, but assigning it a static IP address is challenging.

 

I can set the IP address, but I am unable to set the subnet mask to 255.255.254.0 as I am only getting a set of SM in a drop down list whick are all 255.255.255.x

 

Has anyone configured their WRT400n as an access poit to work on their LAN?

 

Please provide some assistance or point me in the direction to get this done.

 

Thank you

 

 

vai_fan
Posts: 2,766
Registered: ‎09-07-2006

Re: How to configure WRT400n as an access point?

You can not use WRT400N as an acess point with linksys firmware on it. You may try updating your router with DD-WRT firmware which have the feature to be work like an acess point.
venum4802
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎08-13-2009

Re: How to configure WRT400n as an access point?

[ Edited ]

Here is an update,

 

Several Internet searches indicated that to make a router work like an access point, the following must be done:

 

  1. disable DHCP server on router
  2. connect to LAN using one of the ethernet (switch) ports on the router - NOT the Internet port.

To do this the subnet mask on the router needs to be configured to match that issued by the existing DHCP server on the LAN.

 

I spent some time on a chat support session with a really helpful Tech Support personnel (kudos to Linksys for great Tech Support) who indicated that it cannot be done with the subnet mask that I am using - 255.255.254.0.

 

The subnet mask of the WRT400n is hardcoded to several 255.255.255.x options.

Message Edited by venum4802 on 08-17-2009 01:22 PM
Gocean
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎12-01-2010

Re: How to configure WRT400n as an access point?

Have any another people try this before? Does this really work?

EricRFMA
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎12-16-2010

Re: How to configure WRT400n as an access point?

I'm looking to do the same thing, so if anyone actually can accomplish this, I'd be interested in knowing as well.

 

Why do you need to change the subnet mask to 255.255.254.0?

 

Can it be done at all?

 

Thanks!

bsmartt
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎12-22-2010

Re: How to configure WRT400n as an access point?

hmmm I'm trying to accomplish this in the way explained above, and every time I plug my wrt400n into my lan (using a crossover cable in one of the LAN ports, not the internet port), my network goes stops working.  It isn't until I take the wrt400n off the network and reset a computer's network connection that it starts working again.  I'm going to keep messing with it and see if I get any results.

troia
Posts: 450
Registered: ‎10-01-2006

Re: How to configure WRT400n as an access point?

your network stops working because you use a crossover cable from the lan port  of the wrt400n to your lan.

use a straight through cable, instead not a crossover cable.

HughR
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎12-30-2010

Re: How to configure WRT400n as an access point?

Thinking out loud here.  You essentially want to turn off chunks of the WRT400n functionality.

 

You don't want it serving as a DHCP server.

 

You don't want it acting as a router -- just a switch.  (As a router, it thinks that a particular subnet is only on the LAN side and the rest of the IPv4 addresses are on the WAN side.  That isn't what you want for an AP.)

 

Since you are not using the WRT400n as a router, you cannot use the WAN port for anything.  You probably ought to give it a static useless IP address just to keep it from causing problems.  Perhaps one specified in RFC 1918 and not otherwise used by you.

 

If you are not using the router or DHCP server functionality, does the subnet mask (and the subnet IP address range) have any effect on the behaviour of the device?

 

Does the switch have enough capacity (keeping track of MAC addresses) to be used in a large LAN?  The datasheet seems to be silent on the switch capacity.

 

This is speculation on my part.  People's actual experience would be useful.

Expert
Expert
Posts: 12,649
Registered: ‎07-16-2006

Re: How to configure WRT400n as an access point?

1. You don't want to set any IP address on the internet port if you use the WRT as access point. Leave the internet connection mode on "Automatic/DHCP". Setting any static IP address may cause numerous problems.

2. The LAN IP subnet mask always has effect on the "behaviour of the device". Of course, the only relevant thing is access to the web interface then because all other functions (switching and wireless) work on ethernet MAC addresses. The LAN IP and subnet mask should match the connected LAN to have the web interface easily accessible.

3. The WRT is a consumer device and not designed to be used in large LANs, or at least to have large amounts of traffic and devices run through it. When used as simple access point it should be able to handle a reasonable amount of wireless clients.
HughR
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎12-30-2010

Re: How to configure WRT400n as an access point?

 


gv wrote:
1. You don't want to set any IP address on the internet port if you use the WRT as access point. Leave the internet connection mode on "Automatic/DHCP". Setting any static IP address may cause numerous problems.


What kinds of problems?  I specified a way of picking an IP address that should not matter but you may know of issues that does not avoid.

But, as long as it doesn't cause other problems, leaving the connection mode as Automatic/DHCP is a more elegant solution.


2. The LAN IP subnet mask always has effect on the "behaviour of the device". Of course, the only relevant thing is access to the web interface then because all other functions (switching and wireless) work on ethernet MAC addresses. The LAN IP and subnet mask should match the connected LAN to have the web interface easily accessible.


 

Good point.

 

If you have several of WRT400n devices on your network that you want to use as APs, you have better set the router's LAN IP address for each of them to a different value.

 


3. The WRT is a consumer device and not designed to be used in large LANs, or at least to have large amounts of traffic and devices run through it. When used as simple access point it should be able to handle a reasonable amount of wireless clients.

The original poster had a subnet larger than /24.  The specs don't tell enough to know whether that is a problem for the switch.