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Carlson
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎09-08-2007

Says password is incorrect...

[ Edited ]
When I try to connect my older iBook (G3; running OSX) to my WRT54G router by putting in the password, it says the password is incorrect.  However, I am certain that it is correct.  Does anyone know what's going on?  I've tried both of the two security options in the Advisor program, but neither allow me to connect.  It just says that the password is incorrect.
 
I've connected this iBook to this same model router (a slightly older model, but the same model) before that was secure, so I know it has to work.


Message Edited by Carlson on 09-08-2007 03:06 PM

Message Edited by Carlson on 09-08-2007 03:11 PM
Expert
Expert
Posts: 12,649
Registered: ‎07-16-2006

Re: Says password is incorrect...

What wireless security settings do you use on your router? Look on the wireless security tab at http://192.168.1.1/

For wireless connections you don't enter the password of the router. The password of the router protects access to the configuration of the router. The default is "admin".

For wireless connections you use either the passphrase for WPA2 or WPA or the key for WEP. If WEP make sure to enter the key correctly as you can find here. The router shows you the keys in hex thus you have to prefix it with $.
Carlson
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎09-08-2007

Re: Says password is incorrect...

[ Edited ]
OHHHHHH...
 
I use the WPA shared key as the password.  I can change it to anything I want, right?


Message Edited by Carlson on 09-08-2007 03:59 PM
Expert
Expert
Posts: 12,649
Registered: ‎07-16-2006

Re: Says password is incorrect...

With WPA preshared key encryption you have to enter a 8-63 characters passphrase. Again, it is not a password. It is a passphrase which is used to generate the encryption key. You enter a password to access the router configuration at http://192.168.1.1/ The password and the passphrase are two completely different things and have nothing to do with each other except that you may be able to use the same text for both.

In the passphrase, stay away from some special characters which have special meaning in web browser like % or &. If it is correctly implemented there should be no problem with that but you'll never know. Maybe you should start with a simple 8 characters text for the passphrase like "testtest". Don't use only numbers. See if you can get a connection with this simple passphrase and then modify it to something better and more secure.
Carlson
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎09-08-2007

Re: Says password is incorrect...



gv wrote:
With WPA preshared key encryption you have to enter a 8-63 characters passphrase. Again, it is not a password. It is a passphrase which is used to generate the encryption key. You enter a password to access the router configuration at http://192.168.1.1/ The password and the passphrase are two completely different things and have nothing to do with each other except that you may be able to use the same text for both.

In the passphrase, stay away from some special characters which have special meaning in web browser like % or &. If it is correctly implemented there should be no problem with that but you'll never know. Maybe you should start with a simple 8 characters text for the passphrase like "testtest". Don't use only numbers. See if you can get a connection with this simple passphrase and then modify it to something better and more secure.


OK. I set it up for WPA personal, and changed the WPA Shared Key to a standard password that I use for other things. I entered that exact phrase to get on the internet. I'm assuming I did this correctly, as I can get on. There isn't any encryption key or anything though; I just use my exact password. Isn't the encryption key thing only for WEP?
Expert
Expert
Posts: 12,649
Registered: ‎07-16-2006

Re: Says password is incorrect...

Encryption (almost) always works with encryption keys. The question is only how to create this encryption key.

WEP, WPA, and WPA2 all use encryption keys in their implementation to encrypt and decrypt the traffic.

With WEP you can enter up to four keys and you can define one as default transfer key for data transmissions. You can enter 40 bit keys for WEP64 or 104 bit keys for WEP128. The actual keys used for transmissions are 64 bit and 128 bit long. 24 bits are added by the WEP algorithm (the ominous IV vector which is one of the reasons why WEP can be cracked so quickly).

To enter the 40 or 104 bit keys in WEP you have generally three choices. Not all choices are available with all devices and cards:

1. Enter the key in hexadecimals, i.e. 10 or 26 hexadecimal digits (0-9, a-f). This has the advantage that the keys are exactly specified and you can enter them easily with your keyboard.

2. Enter the key in ascii, i.e. 5 or 13 ascii characters, i.e. arbitrary characters including characters which are hard or impossible to enter with a keyboard. If you enter a simple key with your keyboard you can enter it everywhere in the same form. But if your key contains a character like CTRL-C (ascii code 3) it gets difficult to impossible...

3. Enter a passphrase with any characters you like and generate the four keys from the passphrase. While this allows you to enter a nice readable text as passphrase, WEP does not define exactly how to derive the keys from the passphrase. The problem here is that any manufacturer can do it differently. Therefore entering a passphrase may not work on a different computer or device.

WPA and WPA2 basically work the same. It uses only a single key which is 256 bit long. On some devices you can enter the key itself entering 64 hexadecimals. Not all support this, I think. The alternative is to enter a passphrase 8-63 characters long from which the key is derived. For WPA and WPA2 the algorithm to derive the key from the passphrase is exactly defined. Any implementation of WPA or WPA2 follows the same procedure. Therefore you can enter a passphrase on any computer or device and it should derived the same key, thus the devices should be able to talk to each other.

Thus, you'll usually only really see the encryption keys for WEP although they are used everywhere.

The passphrases make things easier to enter and use. However, there are still some pitfalls with passphrases depending on the device you use. For instance, % is a special character when communicating with a web server. If you enter a passphrase with % into the web configuration interface of a router some unpredictable things may happen. Thus, while one device correctly uses % at that place some other device may accidentally encode the % in the passphrase resulting in a different passphrase.