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Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-18-2017

Re: Patch for KRACK vulnerability WPA2?

Please take some time to read on mac filtering, it does not provide additional protections against any but the most basic of users (ie blocking a childs device from the network to keep them from accessing the internet).

 

For an average to advanced attacker, MAC scraping and spoofing is fairly trivial and it is likely anyone taking the time to target a network with krackattack will be able to circumvent mac filtering.

 

 

Posts: 5
Registered: ‎10-18-2017

Re: Patch for KRACK vulnerability WPA2?

Good to know a "team" is working on a fix. Where is the "security advisory page"?

Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-18-2017

Re: Patch for KRACK vulnerability WPA2?

Don't forget to fix my Ea3500 router too. I currently only have been using my android phone, PC's are win 10, and everything else using cat cables. I've had stuff Mac address protected for a while, so I'm concerned about my phone. So am I right in thinking even with my not krack fixed phone it should be relatively ok hooked to my my Mac address protected router? I'm guessing I shouldn't use the phone via wifi anymore on other networks right.
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎10-18-2017

Re: Patch for KRACK vulnerability WPA2?

Probably being worked on by the same "Team". The only Linksys Security Advisory page I can find is: https://www.linksys.com/us/support-article?articleNum=246427

 

related to a previous vulnerability. Considering there are still routers on the list without updates available, and that page went up in April, I'm not exactly betting on a quick turnaround time for this.

Posts: 106
Registered: ‎07-23-2006

Re: Patch for KRACK vulnerability WPA2?


This_Throwaway wrote:

Please take some time to read on mac filtering, it does not provide additional protections against any but the most basic of users (ie blocking a childs device from the network to keep them from accessing the internet).

 

For an average to advanced attacker, MAC scraping and spoofing is fairly trivial and it is likely anyone taking the time to target a network with krackattack will be able to circumvent mac filtering.

 

 


Its true, it is easy to spoof MAC addresses for those determined attackers but enabling this filter results to actually disabling WPS which is the vulnerability being exploited by Reaver bruteforce method. Back then, its either you disable WPS if it is an option or just simply enable MAC filtering to shutoff WPS.

Posts: 5
Registered: ‎10-18-2017

Re: Patch for KRACK vulnerability WPA2?

Thank you, NetEngineer33. That page is a good find, albeit for a different vulnerability. I'm not holding my breath either. Guess it is time to start using a VPN at home, at least for anything potentially sensitive not going to an HTTPS site. Fortunately, my network is not in a crowded area and I have nothing of sufficient interest or value going on to attract a KRACK attack. Well, I hope. 

Posts: 2
Registered: ‎10-19-2017

Re: Patch for KRACK vulnerability WPA2?

FRUSTRATING that this vulnerability has been reported to Linksys back in July 14, 2017 and still NO fix, just more "investigation"?

Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-11-2016

Re: Patch for KRACK vulnerability WPA2?

Why is it taking so long? You have known about this for a while!!!
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎01-21-2007

Re: Patch for KRACK vulnerability WPA2?

While Linksys might have known about this for a while, it is not easy to just drop everything else and fix a bug, even a serious one. And while this is a serious bug that needs to be addressed, if you read the details about how it actually works, it is not exactly trivial for hackers to use it. If you connect to sites using https, you are safe. And the hackers have to be on the same network (for example, at an airport, etc.).

 

And a bug like this serious planning on how they are going to fix it. For example, because of the number of products Linksys has produced over the years, they clearly won't have just one code base. So they need to decide which products they are going to fix it on, how they are going to put it out, especially for the older products. Then there is the actual fix, testing (which is a real pain), etc.

 

Have been developing software since 1962, I have a lot of sympathy with what they will be going through on a bug this serious.

 

That is no excuse to not work real hard to rush out updates. But it is a tremendous amount of work.

 

Charley

 

Posts: 2
Registered: ‎12-21-2016

Re: Patch for KRACK vulnerability WPA2?


charley000 wrote:

While Linksys might have known about this for a while, it is not easy to just drop everything else and fix a bug, even a serious one. And while this is a serious bug that needs to be addressed, if you read the details about how it actually works, it is not exactly trivial for hackers to use it. If you connect to sites using https, you are safe. And the hackers have to be on the same network (for example, at an airport, etc.).

 

And a bug like this serious planning on how they are going to fix it. For example, because of the number of products Linksys has produced over the years, they clearly won't have just one code base. So they need to decide which products they are going to fix it on, how they are going to put it out, especially for the older products. Then there is the actual fix, testing (which is a real pain), etc.

 

Have been developing software since 1962, I have a lot of sympathy with what they will be going through on a bug this serious.

 

That is no excuse to not work real hard to rush out updates. But it is a tremendous amount of work.

 

Charley

 


 

Charley,

 

One problem here is that at least the Linksys router doesn't allow disabling of  HTTP for the web admin panel.  This is likely due to the manner in which their app connects to the router.  Which is probably what is actually going to take them a long time to fix it because they will have to roll out updates to the app as well.  So while theoretically, the attack is currently slightly complicated and there is likely not an in-the-wild hack that isn't in the hands of a nation state, it is only a matter of time before it is compromised and every router out there made by this company easily compromised by some sitting outside your house.  The question is, who will win that race?

 

While I have sympathy for Linksys/Belkin on the software development front as wel, as I too am onel, my sympathy is a bit less because they have made several design choices on their own which limit the ability of the customer to properly secure their router.

 

These choices include:

 

Not allowing the disabling of HTTP for web admin.

Arbitrary number of mac addresses in the mac filter

Hotel style guest wifi, which requires authentication via a webpage, instead of setting it up as a different router, preventing you from creating an insecure guest network for insecure devices like guests or tvs or iot devices.

Weird rules with the ip range that prevent you from assigning static ips outside of the dhcp range.

Lack of an integrated VPN client.

No indication whatsover of the encryption mode of the password, IE is it AES or TKIP?

Their almost manic take on third party firmware.

 

So they have made design decisions that are poor at their core and it is an attack like this that will expose all of us who are currently unfortunate enough to be customers.